April 02, 2011 by

Instant Ginger Beer

Thermomix recipe for ginger beerInspiration: As regular readers here may already know, I am easily inspired by anything with the word “ginger” attached. So when the new Travelling with Thermomix cookbook arrived in my mailbox by surprise (!) I was keen to try the Ginger Beer recipe from its Australian pages. (But not without first tweaking…)

About Ginger Beer: With all due respect to the many Thermomix fans from Down Under who visit here daily… I’m not sure how much ownership their country can claim for this beverage.  Traditional fermented ginger beer is made from GBP (Ginger Beer Plant) — a glutinous mass of symbiotic bacteria and yeast that, under the right conditions will ferment to give ginger beer its particular zing, effervescence, and alcoholic qualities. With proper attention the active “plant” mix can be safely bottled without fear of explosion. While this method takes a bit of time and some special supplies, many of us who enjoy the drink for its gingery character are just as happy to drink a non yeasted, unfermented, non-alcoholic ginger beer made instantly, by Thermomix.

The recipe below is my spin on the Thermomix Ginger Beer recipes that appear in both EveryDay Cooking (EDC, p.26) and Travelling with Thermomix (p.246) available from Thermomix demonstrators and distributors everywhere. (The two “official” recipes are very similar but the EDC version uses 2-3 times the quantity of ginger, resulting in a much stronger drink!)

ginger beer recipeWhat’s different about this recipe? Ginger beer is widely available as a commercially-made soda pop, but the heavy sugar content of these holds no appeal to my savoury-biased palate. I hoped to create a drink that more closely resembled beer in both taste and appearance. Something less sweet, more gingery, and altogether more serious — something to stand in for beer but without the alcohol. Even so, not really a drink for the kiddies either, due to its edgier tones. All I did was substitute molasses for the required sugar while at the same time reducing the sweetness content by half. (If molasses can’t be found where you live, use brown sugar for a close second.) The result? An easy-peasy, dark amber, foamy, stout-like beer substitute — in less than a minute. Deep full bodied flavour with bitter leanings. Served immediately, it comes with a nice creamy head that is pleasing to the eye and the lips. Satisfies like a cold beer. Sip it all day long and still drive safely. Love it.

Thermomix recipe photo

Ginger Beer
fast, easy, and non-alcoholic

Cuisine: Thermomix
Recipe type: Drinks

Ingredients
  • 2 lemons (peeled, pith removed, seeded)
  • 80-100 g fresh ginger root (peeled/sliced)
  • 90 g molasses (substitute brown sugar if needed and adjust to please sweeter palates by increasing to 140 g)
  • 1000 g soda water or carbonated mineral water

Instructions
  1. Put lemon, ginger slices and molasses into Thermomix jug and process 20 seconds/speed 8.
  2. Add 300-400 g soda water and mix for about 4-5 seconds/speed 8.
  3. Insert simmering basket into the jug and use as a strainer while pouring contents into a pitcher or bottle. (For a more clear drink, filter a second time through a finer mesh.) Add remaining soda water to dilute. If not serving all the ginger beer immediately, keep the concentrate in a jar or bottle in the fridge and add your soda water to each glass as needed. I prefer this without ice or garnish for a most beer-like experience. Others may prefer to garnish with lemon/lime, and serving over ice.

 

Want more?

  • According to Wikipedia, ginger beer can be mixed with beer to make one type of shandy, and with dark rum to make a drink (originally from Bermuda) called a Dark ‘N’ Stormy.
  • When mixed with vodka, ginger beer is the main ingredient in the Moscow Mule cocktail (not my favourite, but maybe yours?)
  • Some people use limes instead of lemons…
  • see a short thread about making Ginger Beer Plant from our friends on the Thermomix forum.

See 16 comments from people who cook with Thermomix:

  1. avatar
    Tebasile 2 April 2011 at 10:01 pm (PERMALINK)

    Hi Helene, I love your idea using molasses instead sugar :-)

    Author
  2. avatar
    ThermomixBlogger Helene 2 April 2011 at 11:19 pm (PERMALINK)

    Thanks Tebasile — this works for me, but may not appeal to people who aren’t familiar with molasses. When I was a child in Quebec it was considered ultra decadent to have a bit of molasses on ‘white’ bread (instead of the usual liverwurst on pumpernickel brot). Sometimes we even put the molasses on the bread and dipped it in milk. Wow, things have changed ;-)

    Author
  3. avatar
    Quirky Jo 3 April 2011 at 4:52 am (PERMALINK)

    Helene, you’re a genius!! This is much more my style – thanks so much! I’ll try it tomorrow :)

    Author
  4. avatar
    ThermomixBlogger Helene 3 April 2011 at 5:01 am (PERMALINK)

    Hi Jo – I figured you could test it with Rapadura for us :-)

    Author
  5. avatar
    Judy 3 April 2011 at 5:09 am (PERMALINK)

    Thanks Helene, I love ginger beer but the recipe in the EDC was costing me too much in fresh ginger so I’ve been making lemonade all summer with the lemons hanging over our fence. The reduced quantity of ginger in your recipes means I can have twice as much but with our summer coming to an end, I might only be able to sneak a few batches in before it’s over.

    Author
  6. avatar
    ThermomixBlogger Helene 3 April 2011 at 4:30 pm (PERMALINK)

    Hi Judy — the EDC recipe has so much ginger in it, I don’t know how that can possibly work out. (I say this only because I haven’t tried it.) I did sample the version in the Travelling with TMX book and did my tweaks from there. I’m SO envious of lemons hanging over the fence. Neighbours’ fruit is the best kind and just the thought of fresh lemons from the tree makes me crazy with citrus lust. Here we pay dearly for both our lemons AND ginger. Still, they are healthy and zingy, and just the kind of ingredients I enjoy spending my money on ;-)

    Author
  7. avatar
    trudy 3 April 2011 at 5:27 pm (PERMALINK)

    Thanks Helene. I used to make ginger beer using the “mother” plant but haven’t made it now for several years. Wayne will be happy to know that now I have an easier way he may just get his “ginger” fix!!!

    Author
  8. avatar
    ThermomixBlogger Helene 3 April 2011 at 10:33 pm (PERMALINK)

    I’ll be interested to know if this is Wayne’s kind of ginger fix. It won’t be the same as what he’s used to, especially if he’s used to the “real thing”. Ginger beer from the ‘plant’ (nurtured by time and tenderness) must be quite different from the instant version presented here. … I guess we’ll find out!

    Author
  9. avatar
    Cherie 14 April 2011 at 8:13 pm (PERMALINK)

    I have seen so many types of kitchen machine but was never convinced to buy any until I saw this….IT CAN COOK! And Make lemonade in 5 seconds! Awesome!

    Author
  10. avatar
    ThermomixBlogger Helene 14 April 2011 at 11:06 pm (PERMALINK)

    Hi Cherie — I think one of the things that had greatest impact on me when I first tried using this super machine was the ease of cleaning. It is hands-down, without a doubt the easiest machine to clean. This means I NEVER shy away from preparing that third, fourth, or fifth recipe of the day in the Thermomix. I think it has to do with the ergonomics, plus the stainless steel aspect that combine for an even… “pleasurable” cleaning experience. I just can’t think of another machine or tool I enjoy cleaning so much.

    Author
  11. avatar
    Kalayra 20 June 2012 at 2:18 pm (PERMALINK)

    Love this drink! I make it often, love it with molasses. I make lemonade too and use the leftover rind from the lemonade and leftover pulp from the ginger beer and make lemon ginger marmelade. Just made 3 jars today with the leftovers…

    Author
  12. avatar
    Alodia L.M. 20 September 2012 at 1:43 pm (PERMALINK)

    A Thermomix is pricey, but it’s not expensive. Expensive is everyhting you have to buy already made is uyou don’t own a TM.

    Author
  13. avatar
    ThermomixBlogger Helene 1 October 2012 at 11:47 pm (PERMALINK)

    Alodia, I like how you think ;-)

    Author

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